Whipworms

The whipworm is one of the four most common intestinal parasites of dogs. Whipworms reside in the cecum, which is inside your dog’s body where the small intestine and large intestine meet.

Dogs become infected with whipworms by swallowing infective whipworm eggs in soil or other substances that may contain dog feces.

How will whipworms affect my dog?

Dogs that are infected with a few whipworms may not have any signs of infection. More severe infections can cause bloody diarrhea. If an infected dog is not treated, then severe whipworm infection can cause serious disease and even death.

How do I prevent my dog from getting whipworms?

Whipworm infections can be prevented by removing your dog’s feces regularly from your yard. Because whipworms are sometimes more difficult to diagnose than other intestinal parasites, it is important that you take your dog to see a veterinarian at least annually for a properly conducted fecal examination (test of your dog’s feces).

Your veterinarian can prescribe safe and effective products that treat and control whipworm infections.

Did you know?

  • Dogs with mild whipworm infections may show no symptoms, but whipworms can cause bloody diarrhea, and if not treated, lead to death.
  • Dogs get whipworms from soil or other substances containing dog feces.
  • Keep your yard clean of dog feces to protect your dog.
  • Your veterinarian should test your dog for whipworms at least annually.
  • Other kinds of worms that dogs can get include heartworms, hookworms, roundworms, and tapeworms.

Ask Your Veterinarian

Whipworm Inspections

As with all of the common worms that infect dogs, it is important to have your dog tested on a regular basis by your veterinarian, since dogs in the early stage of infection may show no symptoms. If your dog has whipworms, your veterinarian can prescribe safe and effective products that treat and control the infection.